106 Hwy 22 South P.O. Box 477,
Mapleton, MN 56065
(507) 524-3748
(incl After Hour Emergency)

Preparing For Your Visit

A Day at All Pets Clinic

Written by Dr. Tim Klein. Posted in Preparing For Your Visit

Welcome to a busy day at All Pets Medicine Surgery and Rehab Clinic!  Join us to take in the patients, the clients, the laughs, the serious, and the hilarious!  What an honor to interact like this every day with our four legged pals!

 

 

Help Getting My Pet Into the Clinic / My Vehicle

Written by Dr. Tim Klein. Posted in Preparing For Your Visit

Some of our patients are BIG…or HEAVY! We are happy to come out to your vehicle and give you a hand helping you pet get back and forth with the least amount of excitement (or strain on you!). Just call when you pull into our parking lot, or come in an let us know, and we will come out and give you a hand.

 

Does your pet get nervous easily?

Most of our patients actually do enjoy coming to All Pets Clinic. The smells and excitement of being with their owner in such an exciting place gets them really fired up! But some of our patients do get a little nervous, just like we do when we go to the doctor’s office. Here are some things to consider if that is the case:

  • Let us know ahead of time…we will do our best to get your pet into a secure exam room as soon after you arrive as possible.
  • In some cases, when you pull into our parking lot, either give us a call or come in to let us know that you are here. If it is more comfortable for your pet to stay in the vehicle until “the coast is clear” we are happy to accommodate that!
  • Sometimes, we have a “big dog little person” situation. If your pet is big and strong, and either overly friendly or prefers avoiding other pets, let us know and we are happy to come out and help you bring your pal into the clinic and back out to the vehicle with the least amount of excitement.
  • The same applies to cats who are in carriers. It can be challenging to get through the doors with a heavy carrier without giving your pal a wild ride! We are happy to come out and help you carry him or her into the clinic and back out to the vehicle, just let us know!
  • Our staff and veterinarians appreciate that all of our patients are really individuals, with different personalities. We take our time and use specific techniques (our clients often don’t even know we are doing these things) that help minimize anxiety.
Exotic Pets

Written by Dr. Tim Klein. Posted in Preparing For Your Visit

We welcome your exotic pets here at All Pets. Currently we trim beaks, nails, and wings on birds. We also are happy to examine your rabbits, ferrets, or other pocket pets that might be feeling under the weather!

Healthy Recommendations for Your Cat

Feline Health Recommendations

KITTEN EXAM/ANNUAL EXAM: We highly encourage having your new kitten examined within 48 hours of arriving at your home. Finding any existing issues quickly after purchase helps you to resolve them with the breeder. Getting your new kitten off to a good start following our recommendations sets him/her (and you) up for success. We provide a comprehensive physical exam every time your cat visits us, that exam helps find growing problems early when they are easiest and least expensive to resolve.

Cats should be seen on a yearly bases to receive vaccinations.

PACKAGES: We have packages that help you control the expenses of having a cat. Click here to explore this option.

FELINE LEUKEMIA (FELV) TEST: Feline Leukemia is a fatal cancer of the blood that can be caused by Feline Leukemia Virus (commonly spread among outdoor cats, through bodily fluids). We recommend testing kittens and adult cats of unknown status for FELV.

When bringing a new cat into the home we recommend testing for Feline Leukemia prior to introducing he/she to existing household cats.

VACCINATIONS: Our core vaccinations for feline patients are Rabies and Distemper (RCCP). FELV (Leukemia) vaccine should be given to cats that may have exposure to outdoor cats.

Distemper (RCCP): This vaccine helps protect your cat from the viruses that cause upper respiratory infections (runny eyes, sneezing, cold sores in the mouth, fever, appetite loss).Since these infections are caused by viruses treatment after illness occurs is difficult. These infection occur in both indoor and outdoor cats.
Starting at 6 weeks of age – Given at 6, 9, 12, and 15 weeks, followed by annual boosters.
Starting at >8 Weeks of age – Given at 8, 12, and 15 weeks followed by annual boosters.
Annual booster for adults.

Rabies: Rabies can kill people. The chance of any of our patients getting rabies and spreading it to a person is very low, but the end result if it happens is very severe, so it is legally required. Patients who are not current for this vaccine may represent a legal liability for their owners.
Given at 12 weeks of age, one year later, and then every 3 years thereafter.

Leukemia: (See “Leukemia Test” for information on this virus)
Given at 8 and 12 weeks of age followed by annual boosters based on risk of exposure to outside cats.
Annual booster for adults.

INTESTINAL WORMS: The most common intestinal worms (roundworms and hookworms) can also infest people, worming your pet monthly helps to protect your family and your pet.

Kittens: Should be de-wormed at least twice at 6 and 8 weeks of age.
Adults: Adult cats should be de-wormed monthly with either an oral wormer or topical Revolution.

Bravecto: Fleas also bite people and can transmit disease, controlling fleas monthly helps to protect your family and your pet. Ear mite infestations are common in cats; monthly control also helps avoid this disease.

Revolution: a small amount of liquid that is placed on the skin over the cat’s shoulder blades. This product is applied monthly to control fleas, ear mites, roundworms, hookworms and prevent heartworm disease.

HEARTWORM: Heartworm disease occurs in cats and can cause coughing and asthma type symptoms or even sudden death. There is no treatment for feline heartworm disease so prevention is the best approach.

Revolution: Prevents heartworm disease and controls fleas, ear mites, roundworms and hookworms.

SPAY or NEUTERING: Recommended between 4 and 6 months of age (before puberty). Decreases the incidence of certain cancers and undesirable behaviors. Also, cats that are not spayed or neutered are more likely to roam, having them spayed or neutered reduces the risk of being hit by a car, fighting with other animals, and other injuries.

DECLAWING: Cats provide an important bond with their owners. Declawing house cats that destroy furniture, etc allows them to live a long life in the good care of their owner. Outdoor cats need their claws for protection and should not be declawed. This procedure can be performed at 4 to 6 months of age. Other ways to manage cats desire to scratch include trimming nails or applying a “cap” over the nail to limit damage (example Soft Paws). Providing and training cats to use scratching posts or similar toys is another option.

NUTRITION: We recommend Science Diet. Kittens should be given a high quality kitten food at least three times daily until 1 year of age. A high quality adult food should be fed between 1 and 7 years of age. Starting at 7 years of age a high quality senior food is recommended. Most adult cats should be fed at least twice daily (utilizing the guidelines on the food bag are useful when determining an amount), but not free choice. Develop “household” feeding habits that promote a healthy weight for your cat.

MICROCHIP: A microchip is a very small chip placed under the skin above the shoulder blades. It provides permanent identification in case your cat is lost and the collar/tags come off (many clients put tear away collars to prevent choking if the cat gets caught on something) or if the collar is removed (especially if your cat is stolen). Most animal shelters use microchip scanners, and we scan every stray cat that is brought to our clinic.

SENIOR BLOOD PROFILE: We recommend a yearly blood test to screen for liver/kidney problems and diabetes starting at the age of six. We are unable to tell if these problems persist from the outside. Early intervention and treatment for liver/kidney disease and diabetes is important.

Healthy Recommendations for Your Dog

Canine Health Recommendations

PUPPY EXAM / ANNUAL EXAM: We highly encourage having your new puppy examined within 48 hours of arriving at your home. Finding any existing issues quickly after purchase helps you to resolve them with the breeder. Getting your new puppy off to a good start following our recommendations sets him/her (and you) up for success. We provide a comprehensive physical exam every time your dog visits us, that exam helps find growing problems early when they are easiest and least expensive to resolve. Dogs should be seen on a yearly basis to receive vaccinations.

PACKAGES: We have packages that help you control the expenses of having a dog. Click here to explore this option.

VACCINATIONS: Our core vaccinations for dogs are Rabies and Distemper/Parvo and Lyme. Bordetella and Leptospirosis vaccines are given based on the dog’s lifestyle and risk factors.

  • Distemper/Parvovirus
    Parvovirus is a virus that causes severe diarrhea with high risk of death. We see parvovirus only in patients who are no current with this vaccine.

    • (DA2PPC): 2 or 3 doses depending on age at first dose.
    • Starting at 6-8 weeks of age – Give at 6, 8 and 12 weeks, followed by yearly boosters.
    • Starting at >8 weeks of age – Give at 8 and 12 weeks, followed by yearly boosters.
  • Rabies
    Rabies can kill people. The chance of any of our patients getting rabies and spreading it to a person is very low, but the end result if it happens if very severe, so it is legally required. Patients who are not current for this vaccine may represent legal liability for their family.

    • Given at 12 weeks of age, one year later, and then every 3 years thereafter.
  • LymeDisease
    Lyme disease is one of the tick diseases that we see, and the only one with a vaccine. We regularly have both city and country dogs test positive, so we recommend this vaccine for all of our canine patients.

    • Give at 8 and 12 weeks, followed by yearly boosters.
  • Bordetella (kennel cough)
    Bordetella is a bacterial infection which causes a deep, raspy cough. Dogs can contract this from each other through close contact (boarding, grooming, puppy classes, dog park, etc).

    • Generally recommended at 8 weeks of age. First dose lasts one year. Recommend before being commingled with other dogs.
    • Annual boosters for adults.
  • Leptospirosis
    Leptospirosis can cause severe kidney problems and is spread through wildlife (especially raccoons) urine. There is not a good practical test available for Lepto, so we are unsure how frequently it occurs. We recommend vaccinating patients at high risk of exposure.

    • Administered at 8 and 12 weeks, followed by yearly boosters.
  • Influenza
    Canine Influenza is an evolving health issue in our area, we recommend patients who are at risk for contracting it be vaccinating, please see canine influenza to address your pets risk.

    • Recommended at 6 weeks of age, boostered 3-4 weeks after initial dose.
    • Annual boosters for adults.
  • Influenza
    Canine Influenza is an evolving health issue in our area, we recommend patients who are at risk for contracting it be vaccinating, please see canine influenza to address your pets risk.

    • Recommended at 6 weeks of age, boostered 3-4 weeks after initial dose.
    • Annual boosters for adults.

 

INTESTINAL WORMS: The most common intestinal worms (roundworms and hookworms) can infest people. Worming your pet monthly helps to protect your family and your pet.

  • Puppies: Should be de-wormed at least twice at 6 and 8 weeks of age.
  • Adults: If Heartgard Plus or Iverhart are used, these products contain intestinal de-wormers.

 

HEARTWORM DISEASE: The American Heartworm Association recommends all dogs receive preventative every month, all year long, and have an annual blood test. We have several dogs each year that test positive.Most clients use Heartgard Plus + Nexgard or Frontline for comprehensive parasite control.

  • Heartgard Plus: a tasty chewable given monthly, prevents heartworm disease, kills and prevents roundworms and hookworms.
  • Iverhart Max: chewable tablet given monthly, prevents heartworm disease, kills and prevents roundworms and hookworms.

 

Bravecto Chew and Bravecto Liquid: Fleas and Ticks also bite people and can transmit disease, controlling fleas and ticks monthly helps to protect your family and your pet. The Bravecto chew is a flavored chew administered every 12 weeks to control fleas and ticks. Bravecto liquid is applied to the skin between the shoulder blades to control fleas and ticks.

SPAY or NEUTERING: Recommended between 4 and 6 months of age (before puberty). Decreases the incidence of certain cancers and undesirable behaviors. Also, dogs that are not spayed or neutered are more likely to roam when a neighboring dog is in heat, having them spayed or neutered reduces the risk of being hit by a car, fighting with other animals, and other injuries.

NUTRITION: We recommend Science Diet. Puppies should be given puppy food fed at least 3 times daily until 1 year of age. Adult food should be feed between 1 and 8 years of age. Starting at 8 years of age senior food is recommended. Most adult dogs should be fed at least twice daily, but not free choice. Develop “household” feeding habits that promote a healthy weight for your dog.

MICROCHIP: A microchip is a very small chip placed under the skin above the shoulder blades. It provides permanent identification in case your dog is lost and the collar/tags come off (many clients put tear away collars to prevent choking if the dog gets caught on something) or if the collar is removed (especially if your dog is stolen). Most animal shelters use microchip scanners, and we scan every stray dog that is brought to our clinic.

SENIOR BLOOD PROFILE: We recommend a yearly blood test to screen for liver/kidney problems and diabetes starting at the age of six. We are unable to tell if these problems persist from the outside. Early intervention and treatment for liver/kidney disease and diabetes is important.

My Pet Needs Help After Hours

We are available 24/7 for your pet’s after hours emergencies. We do not send our patients to a Referral Emergency Clinic just because the symptoms occur after hours.  Call our regular number and follow the prompts to get through to our on-call veterinarian.  Leave a message (with your name and number) and we will call you back in a few minutes.

When you call, it is helpful to have the following information:

  • Summary of what your pet’s symptoms are and how long they have been occurring.
  • How frequently have your pet’s symptoms been occurring (for example, vomiting once per hour, once per day, once per week…)
  • Your pet’s temperature (the only accurate way to determine if your pet has a fever is with a rectal thermometer).

Our veterinarians are happy to see our patients when an emergency is occurring after hours.  Expect the emergency veterinarian to ask you some questions.  These questions help us to know what to plan for if we do schedule your pet for an afterhours visit.

Because after hours visits are more expensive than regular hours visits, our clients often appreciate when the emergency vet discusses the options of either seeing the patient after hours or when the clinic opens again, if it seems appropriate based on the symptoms.

Please be respectful of our emergency veterinarians and their family when calling, please only use our emergency line for situations that cannot wait until our regular hours.

Payment Options

We have a policy of payment at the time of service.

Give us call to ask about spreading the cost of our services out over a year.

However, we also understand that our clients experience varying situations at times. Here are a number of other ways that we try to help our clients deal with the financial and emotional sides of things associated with their pet’s care.

  • We feel that any client who goes to the trouble of telling a friend about us deserves a $25 gift certificate when that friend brings their pet to us!! Thanks!!
  • We accept cash, check, Visa and Mastercard.
  • We accept Care Credit. Apply for Care Credit here!
  • Our “Preventative Care Packages” allow clients to spread their annual vaccine, blood test costs and other common expenses over monthly payments, plus experience significant savings. (For more information on these programs click here)
  • We have a “Pay It Forward” program, which allows clients to put money into their account at All Pets, until enough has accumulated to cover expected expenses.
  • We are available 24/7 for your pet’s after hours emergencies. Call our regular number and follow the prompts to get through to our on-call veterinarian.
  • We offer a 5% senior discount.
  • Gas is expensive and many of our clients travel from far away to see us, so we help cover some of their fuel with a $10 off any invoice over $100 services for clients traveling over 15 miles one way to see us.

 

What to Bring For Annual Exams

Preventative care improves your pet’s quality of life so much, and minimizes the impact on your bank account compared to treating illness…good job getting your pet in annually for his or her checkup and vaccinations.

Be sure to bring:

  • A list of all any questions or concerns that you have about your pet’s health.  We want to answer your questions!
  • Updated account information – if you plan to have another family member bring your pet to the clinic, it is helpful for you to call and review your account information to assure that it is accurate.
  • Know how you plan to handle payments – sometimes this can be awkward if another member of the family brings your pet in so don’t hesitate to give us a call ahead of time.  Also, we do have payment options (click here for payment options).  Some of the options require paperwork to be filled out, so if you might have interest in this area don’t hesitate to call us and we can help have all of that done ahead of time!
  • The bottles (or pictures of the labels) of everything that your pet has been taking orally – medications, supplements, treats, etc.
  • A picture of the food bag name that your pet has been eating.
  • We feel that you have the best knowledge of your pets overall health.  The things that we find during the annual visit are nuggets of additional information for you to add to the rest of your knowledge about your pet.  We will let you know what we find during the annual visit, what our recommendations are, and answer all of your questions. Nothing happens with your pet unless you are comfortable with it!

The annual exams involve several aspects:

  • A thorough physical exam – we regularly find things that are affecting your pet’s quality of life just by looking him or her over and listening to their heart and lungs.
  • Vaccines – to help prevent common uncomfortable illnesses – important for indoor cats and dogs as well as those who go outdoors!
  • Blood tests – some illnesses are common in our patients after they reach a certain age (usually around 6 years of age).  These illnesses can be treated if found early, but the only way to find them early is with a blood test (click here for senior blood tests).
  • Stance analyzer – joint stiffness, especially in the rear end, is common in our patients after they reach a certain age (usually around 6 years of age).  Beginning at this age, we begin tracking your pet’s stiffness level during the physical exam and with a type of scales called a stance analyzer.   (Click here for stance analyzer.)
What to Bring If My Pet is Sick

When you call to make an appointment, be sure to ask the technician this question.  The answer she can give at that time is specific to the symptoms that your pet is showing.  However, here are some good general guidelines:

When you call, it is helpful to have the following information:

  • Summary of what your pet’s symptoms are and how long they have been occurring.
  • How frequently have your pet’s symptoms been occurring (for example, vomiting once per hour, once per day, once per week…)
  • Your pet’s temperature (the only accurate way to determine if your pet has a fever is with a rectal thermometer).
  • Know how you plan to handle payments – we are payment at the time of service, sometimes this can be awkward if another member of the family brings your pet in so don’t hesitate to talk with us about this ahead of time.  Also, we do have payment options (click here for payment options).  Some of the options require paperwork to be filled out, so if you might have interest in this area don’t hesitate to call us during regular hours and and we can help have all of that done ahead of time!

When you leave home, bring the following:

  • The bottles (or pictures of the labels) of everything that your pet has been taking orally – medications, supplements, treats, etc.
  • A picture of the food bag name that your pet has been eating.
  • Urine or fecal samples if appropriate with the symptoms.

If there is a possibility that your pet may be hospitalized:

  • Food
  • Favorite blanket or toy