106 Hwy 22 South P.O. Box 477,
Mapleton, MN 56065

(507) 524-3748
(incl After Hour Emergency)

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All Pets Neighborhood Patient Pickup Program

dog in carWe are proud to expand our free Neighborhood Patient Pickup Program to all of our clients outside who drive far to get here and offer a ride to pets in need of veterinary care. The All Pets Clinic van will be in the Mankato area the first three Tuesdays of the month and the last Tuesday of every month we will rotate through each of the surrounding towns, Wells, Winnebago, Lake Crystal, and St. Clair.  See below for where we will be each week of the month.  Also, if you need food or meds, just let us know and we can bring them along to the meeting site instead of mailing. 

There is no charge for this service.                          
Remember to look for the van with the orange cone on the hood!!

 

  Week1 Week2 Week3 Week4
1st AM Pickup Mankato
Kwik Trip 7:15-7:30
Commerce Dr
Mankato
Kwik Trip 7:15-7:30
North of Menards
Mankato
Kwik Trip 7:15-7:30
Near MSU
Surrounding Town
7:30-7:45
2nd AM Pickup Casey's 7:45-8:00
N. Riverfront
Casey's 7:45-8:00
N. Riverfront
Casey's 7:45-8:00
N. Riverfront
1st PM DropOff Mankato
Kwik Trip 3:45-4:00
Commerce Dr
Mankato
Kwik Trip 3:45-4:00
North of Menards
Mankato
Kwik Trip 3:45-4:00
Near MSU
Mankato
Surrounding Town
4:15-4:30
2nd PM DropOff Casey's 4:15-4:30
N. Riverfront
Casey's 4:15-4:30
N. Riverfront
Casey's 4:15-4:30
N. Riverfront

In order to make the pick-up/drop off process as smooth as possible and be on time for everyone, it is important that we get all information and appropriate forms filled out ahead of time. We are happy to email, fax or mail these forms to you to fill out and return to us so that we can schedule your pet for their appointment.

Upon arrival to the clinic, the doctors and technicians will gently and thoroughly examine your pet, and will call you to decide what care you prefer for your pet. We will do nothing without your permission, and will schedule a convenient time to call you (probably between 10:00am & Noon). It is important that you be available by phone during this time so that we can go over recommendations and get approval for any treatments. We will also be collecting payment before performing the treatments that you approved, which can occur by credit/debit card over the phone. If credit/debit card is not an option for you we can certainly discuss other payment options before scheduling.

Currently this service is limited to patients less than 80 pounds. Our patients that weigh 25 pounds and under must arrive at our van in a kennel/carrier that is no larger than 21x15x16. Our larger patients must arrive on a secure leash and we will provide a kennel for their transportation. You will be provided a 4 digit code that you MUST have to pick up in the afternoon. If you designate someone other than yourself to pick up your pet in the afternoon, they will need that 4 digit code. This system assures us that the proper person is picking up your pet, and gives you the flexibility of designating someone other than yourself to bring your pet home.

Our van will be at each location for 15 minutes. If you are running behind schedule, just call the clinic – we will be happy to meet you at the second location for our Mankato stops or back at the clinic.

Our clinic van has been providing pickups for our patients for a long time, and our clients have been requesting a scheduled, inexpensive, convenient way for their pets to get a ride to the clinic. The response to our Neighborhood Pickup Program has been nice, so let us know if you want more information!

Give us a call at the clinic (507-524-3748) if you have any other questions regarding which location we will be at or would like to schedule a pick up appointment for your pet. As time gets closer to your pets scheduled appointment we will be calling you to see if you are interested in taking part in this service.

What Does a Day at All Pets Clinic Look Like?

Welcome to a busy day at All Pets Medicine Surgery and Rehab Clinic!  Join us to take in the patients, the clients, the laughs, the serious, and the hilarious!  What an honor to interact like this every day with our four legged pals!

Greetings to our All Pets Clinic Clients!!

We have been getting quite a few calls concerning Canine Influenza (also called Canine Flu). Here are some important bullet points:

  • Influenza in our canine patients usually makes them pretty sick. Common symptoms include loss of appetite, coughing, runny nose and eyes, fever, and lethargy. If your pet has some matter in the eyes or a mild cough, but is eating normally and generally acting normally, it is probably not influenza. It may be something else though so don’t hesitate to call us with any questions!
  • Canine influenza has not been shown to infect people.
  • There have not been any documented cases of canine influenza in Minnesota at this time. There have been cases in nearby states, including Wisconsin.
  • This virus spreads easily. It is present in high numbers in the nasal secretions of infected patients and the virus can live for short periods of time in those secretions when they are left on objects like food/water bowls, our clothing, etc. So, it can be spread from dog to dog, and it can be spread from exposure to contaminated objects.
  • There are several strains of canine influenza, and they keep changing, a little like human influenza strains do. So there are vaccines available that provide protection against the strains within that vaccine, but like the human flu vaccines they don’t cover all of the strains that are out there. We have the most current vaccine on hand, it protects for the influenza strain H3N8 but it is unknown how well it protects against the most recently identified H3N2 strain.
  • There are lab tests available that allow us to test our canine patients for both strains.
  • Since influenza is a virus, recovery from infection requires that the patient’s own immune system gets rid of the virus – just like humans, our body needs to get rid of the infection. Antibiotics help avoid secondary bacterial infections, but do nothing against the virus itself. So treating our canine patients who have influenza involves doing things to keep them hydrated, keeping their fever down, keeping them eating, and treating secondary infections while their body deals with the influenza virus.
  • Here are our recommendations as of this time concerning Canine Influenza:
    • Our patients who are most at risk are the ones who are exposed to other dogs frequently (dog park, day care/boarding, going for a walk, etc.), and whose owners are exposed to other dogs frequently. So decreasing exposure to other dogs is an important risk reducer.
    • However, common sense should be applied here – there is a difference in how aggressively we should change our pet’s quality of life due to concern over influenza now (with no known cases in MN) vs. if that situation changes and we start to see cases here in our state.
    • The highest risk areas for the first cases to appear are situations where dogs are entering MN from out of state. These situations include humane shelters that receive pets from out of state, and homes that foster for those organizations, snow birds who are returning with their pets, etc. All of those situations provide an important and positive role for dogs in our society, but awareness of risk levels may help our clients make good decisions about where to exercise their pets and with whom.
  • We are currently recommending the vaccine only for patients who are at high risk – service dogs, dogs that require frequent boarding or daycare, dogs whose owners work at a canine daycare center or shelter, etc. Remember that the vaccine may provide protection against only some of the strains available.
  • If you have questions about canine influenza or feel your pet may be showing symptoms, please do not hesitate to contact us!! www.allpetsvetmed.com

 

Thanks for bringing your pets to us!
The Doctors, Technicians, and Booty – from All Pets Clinic

Rabies in Minnesota???

Christy Stone, DVM
All Pets Medicine, Surgery, and Rehabilitation Clinic

OK, so we all know that your pets should be vaccinated for rabies, but why? Yes, the cities all require it for licensure and your veterinarian always recommends it, but what is the real prevalence? I think you’ll be surprised…

First of all, what exactly is Rabies?? According to the Minnesota Department of Animal Health (MN DAH): “Rabies is a preventable viral disease of mammals that affects the central nervous system causing encephalopathy leading to death. The virus is most often transmitted through the bite of a rabid animal. There are two forms of rabies: (1) dumb rabies, in which an animal acts sick, does not eat and is lethargic (mimics a lot of sick pets!) and (2) furious rabies, in which an animal shows aggressive and vicious behavior. Over the past 100 years, there has been a substantial decrease in the number of human rabies cases due to the availability of a vaccine and vigilant surveillance by public health officials.”

Because rabies is a reportable disease (when your veterinarian diagnoses it, they must report it to the MN DAH), we can easily find out how many cases, in what species, and where they were for any given time period. For 2013, MN DAH reports “There were 62 animals diagnosed with rabies in Minnesota last year. As is typical, wildlife comprise the majority of rabies cases in Minnesota with 36 bats and 20 skunks testing positive in 2013. In addition, two bovine, one caprine, and two equine tested positive along with this most recent feline case.” And that’s just how many were diagnosed…imagine how many were never diagnosed!!

We know that incidence rates should and indeed are lower in our companion animals (dogs and cats) because this is the population most commonly vaccinated. The vaccine is VERY effective.

We often get asked why “indoor only” pets need to be vaccinated as they are not exposed to the outdoor population. As you can see, Minnesota had 36 bats test positive for rabies last year. Bats are really good at getting into homes and thus pose a potential threat to our “indoor only” pets.

Here’s what the Minnesota Department of Animal Health has to say…

“Although the majority of rabies cases occur in wildlife, pets and other domestic animals can be infected with rabies if they are bitten by rabid animals. Protecting your pets from rabies is extremely important, especially given the substantial amount of contact humans have with their pets.

If your pet is bitten or scratched by a wild animal, the wild animal should be submitted for rabies testing. Specimens can be submitted to the MN Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory with the assistance of your veterinarian. If the wild animal is not available for testing, contact your veterinarian or the Minnesota Board of Animal Health for advice.”

Long story short…it’s safest to keep your pets current on their Rabies vaccine!!

Post Tagged with Christy Stone DVM, Dr. Jenn Heesen, Dr. Tim Klein, mankato veterinarian, mapleton veterinarian, Rabies

Common Reasons That Rabbits Visit Our Clinic!

Common Reasons That Rabbits Visit Our Clinic!
Tim Klein, DVM
All Pets Medicine, Surgery, and Rehabilitation Clinic

Rabbits hop in to see us regularly and for a variety of reasons. Here are some of the more common things that families who have rabbits should keep in mind.

Rabbits benefit from being spayed or neutered just like other pets. Your rabbit should be at least 4 months old before his or her big surgery day, and there is no upper limit on age.

Rabbits in the USA typically do not require vaccinations, but often benefit from worming. Other parasites to watch for include ear mites, fleas, and lice. If your rabbit is scratching, losing weight, or has abnormal stools … let us know!

Keeping your rabbit’s toenails trimmed will help keep a happy smile on his or her face!

Speaking of smiles, the most common issue that we find in rabbits who are losing weight is that their front (incisor) teeth get too long. In rabbits these teeth continue growing throughout their life. The top and bottom front teeth should touch other but should not overlap. If they overlap they should be trimmed. This is not very difficult but many of our clients bring their rabbits in for us to do the trimming. Check your rabbit’s incisor teeth monthly.

The most common reason that we see digestive problems in rabbits is … too many pellets in their diet. It is crucial that rabbits get at least 85% or more of their daily intake in the form of good quality timothy hay (available at most pet stores). That means that only 10% to 15% of their diet should be pellets. Rabbits enjoy pellets about like we enjoy ice crème, and if you pile the amount of pellets that your rabbit needs for the day in your hand it makes a sadly small looking pile! So the tendency is for rabbit families to feed way too many pellets and too little hay, which is not healthy at all.

Runny nose … run to the phone and give us a call. Snuffles is a fairly common respiratory infection that rabbits can get. We will need to take a look and get your bunny on the right medications.

Take the same approach if you notice sores anywhere on your bunny’s body. Call us. Sores on the feet are often caused moist bedding. Rabbits are like other pets – they have the best quality of life when their environment is dry, draft free, with proper access to food and water. Also, rabbits tend to settle their disagreements with each other fairly directly, and the fights that result from those disagreements can cause wounds that are significant and hard to find under their hair.

A final thought. I have listened and laughed as clients share stories about how much they enjoy interacting with their rabbits, watching them run around the house, and even spending time outside (they are leash trained)! The time outside is especially fun for everyone. Just remember that the area that has the grass that your bunny likes the best also has the grass that wild bunnies like…and so there is risk of wild bunny worm eggs, fleas, ear mites, etc. Also, rabbits on leashes + dogs on leashes too often leads to a sad ending…place your rabbit in a location where predators of any kind can’t get close enough to scare your bunny or worse. Don’t let that keep you from the fun of bringing him or her outside, just be selective about location and predators.

That hits the biggies!! Remember, if you have any questions just give us a call and we will sure do our best to help you out!

Post Tagged with Christy Stone DVM, dental disease, Dr. Tim Klein, DVM, Jennifer Heesen, neuter, pet behavior problems, pet dental cleaning, pet diarrhea, pet food, pet health, rabbit, rabbit health, spay, vaccinations

Look at my Pearly White Teeth!!!

Look at my Pearly White Teeth!!!
Jamie Campbell, CVT
All Pets Medicine, Surgery, and Rehabilitation Clinic

As I mentioned in my bio on our web page, my favorite part of being a veterinary technician is seeing what an impact we make in our patients and their families lives. It is absolutely amazing to see what dental pain or ‘a tooth ache’ can do to a pet’s quality of life or even the negative effect it can have on their personality and health. Dentistry seems to be one of the areas we make a huge impact on our patients lives. For those of us with pets, the last thing on our minds during the day is if Fluffy had his or her teeth brushed today. We all have very busy schedules and it is so easy to look past. But the fact of the matter is dental care REALLY is important in our pets!

Because most of our clients are familiar with Booty (our friendly clinic cat), I will use him for an example. In mid-July we scheduled Booty for a routine dental cleaning. He had slight to moderate dental calculus and gingivitis, and was not showing us any signs of pain in his mouth. It was not until he was sedated and positioned on the table that we found both upper canine teeth had severe gingival recession (gums receding back on the tooth, showing the root) and one of his molars was diseased and painful. After extracting the “bad” teeth, we cleaned and polished his teeth. The next week we noticed a dramatic change in Booty’s attitude! He was happier and playing much more then usual. Needless to say, he was feeling better after getting those painful teeth out of his mouth. Staff members have noticed this change in their own pets and clients have let us know “their pet’s haven’t felt this good in years” after such cleanings as well.

Regardless of the age of your pet, it is important to start a good dental hygiene routine. We know brushing isn’t always realistic (pet doesn’t like it, family doesn’t have time, etc), so we offer numerous forms of dental care products here at the clinic. Examples include food products (Science Diet T/D), treats (tartar chews, bones, etc), or even water additives! A professional dental cleaning is needed to remove any tartar accumulated on teeth, and after that preventative care will help slow it from building up again (and save money on another cleaning). We are always more then happy to go over any of these products or techniques. Just remember… YOUR PET HAS A SMILE TOO smile

Post Tagged with cat bad breath, cats, Christy Stone DVM, dental disease, dog bad breath, dogs, Dr. Tim Klein, mankato vet, mankato veterinarian, mapleton veterinarian, pet dental cleaning, pet dental tartar, pet health, teeth cleaning, Tim Klein DVM, tooth pain, veterinary clinic.

How Do Different Pet Foods Measure Up?

How Do Different Pet Foods Measure Up?
Tim Klein, DVM
All Pets Medicine, Surgery, and Rehabilitation Clinic

Think the main determination of whether a food measures up is where “corn” shows up on the label? Maybe … or maybe not!

The whole area of “which food to buy” for our pets is very confusing! Your pets are our patients, and when that issue is brought up at All Pets Clinic, you deserve a science based answer vs. the latest internet search.

To help our clients compare foods in a more meaningful way than the label can offer, we have developed a 10 point set of questions with a composite score that takes into account the difficulty in comparing pet foods by looking at their label or what their price is. Our attempt is to compare based on the quality, safety, and trustworthiness of the food and the manufacturer.

Below are examples of two foods that many of our patients are being fed, and how they “measure up” using our evaluation. We are filling this out for many of the foods that we see our patients being fed, and have that available for our clients to look at.

So take a look at the two examples below … I know which one I would feed to my dog Casey!

Brand #1
Positive responses = 1/10

1. Does the AAFCO Statement match the claims on the front of the bag?

  • This bag’s AFFCO statement says it is an adult food, the front of the bag says it is a senior food.

2. Was the food actually fed to pets before being put on the shelf for you to buy?

  • AAFCO Statement indicates Formulation Method was used for this food = the company did no trials with pets, just calculated the amounts of each ingredient needed to meet the minimum for each nutrient on the label. Cannot tell how well those ingredients can actually be digested by pets.

Does the company confirm that it’s nutrition can be trusted, with Peer Reviewed Research

  • No, this company reported no Peer Reviewed Research
  • Peer Reviewed means their research that they want to publish is evaluated by nutritionists who do not work for the company. Some companies do research inside the company and may or may not be honest with what they write about it on the bag. Peer Reviewed research helps confirm the company’s credibility.

4. Can we tell by looking at the label whether good or bad ingredients were used to make the food? No, no pet food labels tell you if the ingredients used were high or low quality.

5. Does the company make at least 95% of their foods at plants that they own and can assure quality?

    • This company does not own its own facilities, and uses 3rd party plants.
    • Some companies make a lot of their foods at 3rd party plants, and rely on those plants’ quality control.

6. Does the company safety test all poultry ingredients for Salmonella and refuse any positives?

      • This company checks batches of the final product, but does not check ingredients.
      • Salmonella is the most common human health hazard from pet food, especially children and elderly. Checking ingredients is the best safety measure because it keeps Salmonella out of all parts of the food they sell.

7. Does the company utilize constant ingredient sourcing (uses same ingredients regardless of changes in ingredient pricing)?

      • This company would not comment on this.
      • Some companies use “least cost sourcing” (buy the cheapest ingredient – example might buy poultry product one week and beef product the next week because of changes in price). This means what is really in the bag changes constantly.

8. Does this company purchase ingredients from “rendering” companies?

      • No
      • Rendering companies pick up animals that die at the farm, usually within a few days of death, and then process them.

9. Does this company avoid purchasing ingredients from China (where the majority of recalled ingredients have originated from)? This company purchases ingredients from China.

10. Are the company’s research veterinary facilities inspected and approved by the American Animal Hospital Association? This company does not own any research facilities; it contracts with 3rd parties and relies on their quality standards for research animal health care.

 

Brand 2
Positive responses = 9/10

1. Does the AAFCO Statement match the claims on the front of the bag?

  • This bag’s AFFCO statement says it is an adult food, the front of the bag also says it is an adult food.

2. Was the food actually fed to pets before being put on the shelf for you to buy?

  • AAFCO Statement indicates Feeding Trial Method used = this is the “gold standard”. Means that before being sold in stores, feeding trials showed that pets being fed this food did not lose weight or develop abnormal blood test results. This gives credibility to the degree that the ingredients used can be digested by pets.

3. Does the company confirm that it’s nutrition can be trusted, with Peer Reviewed Research

  • Yes, this company has lots of Peer Reviewed Research
  • Peer Reviewed means their research is evaluated by nutritionists who do not work for the company. Some companies do research inside the company and may or may not be honest with what they write on the bag. Peer Reviewed research helps confirm the company’s credibility.

4. Can we tell by looking at the label whether good or bad ingredients were used to make the food? No, no pet food labels tell you if the ingredients used were high or low quality.

5. Does the company make at least 95% of their foods at plants that they own and can assure quality?

  • Yes, this company does, so they have control over quality standards.
  • Some companies make a lot of their foods at 3rd party plants, and rely on those plants’ quality control.

6. Does the company safety test all poultry ingredients for Salmonella and refuse any positives?

  • Yes, this company does.
  • Salmonella is the most common human health hazard from pet food, especially children and elderly. Checking ingredients is the best safety measure because it keeps Salmonella out of all parts of the food they sell.

7. Does the company utilize constant ingredient sourcing (uses same ingredients regardless of changes in ingredient pricing)?

  • Yes, this company uses constant ingredient sourcing, meaning they buy the same ingredients all the time regardless of cost (which increases the reliability of the food but also increases the cost).
  • Some companies use “least cost sourcing” (buy the cheapest ingredient – example might buy poultry product one week and beef product the next week because of changes in price). This means what is really in the bag changes constantly.

8. Does this company purchase ingredients from “rendering” companies?

  • No
  • Rendering companies pick up animals that die at the farm, usually within a few days of death, and then process them.

9. Does this company avoid purchasing ingredients from China (where the majority of recalled ingredients have originated from)? This company does not purchase ingredients from China.

10. Are the company’s research veterinary facilities inspected and approved by the American Animal Hospital Association? Yes this company owns its own research facilities and the veterinary facilities are approved by the AAHA.

Post Tagged with best pet food, cat food, comparing pet foods, dog food, Dr. Tim Klein, mankato veterinarian, mapleton veterinarian, pet food, pet food safety, pet health

Keep Your Pet Out of Harm’s Way During the Holiday Season!!

Keep Your Pet Out of Harm’s Way During the Holiday Season!!
All Pets Medicine, Surgery, and Rehabilitation Clinic
Tim Klein, DVM

The emergency calls that I’ve seen so far this holiday season have gotten me thinking. When I put myself in my client’s shoes, I can see that the holiday “need to remember” list is often a long one – need to remember the kids, the presents, and what time to be everywhere. So I want to help make the “how to safe proof the house” list for the furry members of our family as easy as possible.

So here are some general areas to make sure you have covered.

Things that enter your pet’s mouth and go down the hatch. Avoid those things. Well, unless the stuff going down the hatch is the food they are already used to, that’s the safe (and exceedingly boring) exception. What …no treats!!

That’s hardly the holiday spirit Klein!! Ho Ho Ho!!

Honestly, things ingested are the number one cause of emergency visits during the holiday season. Some of those things are not surprising – any edible food that your pet’s digestive system is not used to can = diarrhea and vomiting, maybe pancreatitis.

Some ingested things are a little more surprising – chocolate causes caffeine toxicity, stringy ornaments or objects can = surgery to remove an obstruction (ornaments, stringy things that cats especially like, stuff that is not usually lying on the floor like socks and underwear or toys).

Some of the things that we have found during surgery have been a little … um …embarrassing for the owners – all in the holiday spirit of course!

Some ingested things are pretty surprising. An example is that most of our clients who have pets do a great job in their own house of picking up all the Tylenol tabs that accidentally fall on the floor, or making sure that the mouse poison is out of reach.

But what about the family house that they visit for the holiday … ?

The rest of the list is somewhat of a mixed bag of holiday nuts. Holiday emergency lacerations (usually either paw cuts from the sharp crust on the snow or big dog / little dog disagreements) are pretty common. Lameness from strains / sprains / fractures from extra play on slippery surfaces come right in there too.

Sometimes things are more serious. The rescue pet-in-training that is still just “shy” … well actually the holiday spirit does not always extend to visiting parents whose kids have just been bitten, and I’ve actually had to deal with some of these emergency situations, as have my human physician friends.

So to put a nice little “Bow on this Blog” … remember couple of things. Use a lot of common sense about what you expose your pet to during the holiday season. And if you have any questions call us. We don’t mind or charge for questions. Even if you call and there is no emergency, just talking it through usually helps the whole family sleep better. And a good night’s sleep is a good idea during the holidays!!

Post Tagged with Christy Stone DVM, Dr. Tim Klein, emergency veterinary, mankato vet, mapleton veterinarian, mouse poison, pet diarrhea, pet health, pet vomiting, rat poison, Tim Klein DVM, veterinarian, veterinary emercency clinic

Helping Pets Who Have Behavior Problems

Helping Pets Who Have Behavior Problems
Marhya Johnson, CVT
All Pets Medicine, Surgery, and Rehabilitation Clinic

Binx, our adorable three legged friend is in desperate need of some behavior modifications. Binx is very fun loving and full of energy. He enjoys getting all the attention from everyone at the clinic and from all the visitors that stop in throughout the day. With all the commotion that goes on at the clinic one would think that he would have more than enough stimulation to keep him busy and out of trouble. Unfortunately that just isn’t always the case, and sometimes he gets into trouble by doing things that we don’t want him to.

However, we are not alone when it comes to having one of our furry family members not behave like we would like them to. Many of our clients are in this same boat or have been in the boat and made it to shore. Those that have made it to shore we applaud you! Those who are in the boat with us, stay strong. We will make it together.

I feel that behavioral information should be easily accessible to everyone. There shouldn’t be a secret to having a well-trained animal and it shouldn’t cost an arm and a leg. I feel that the only way to make this happen is to be well educated and to properly educate others. If we are able to understand why an animal acts the way it does, maybe we will be able to prevent certain behaviors from occurring. Maybe this will help decrease the number of animals that are surrendered to animal shelters each year because of behavioral issues. Most animals are naturally loving creatures and should be enjoyed. We are committed to that at All Pets Clinic.

Having a properly trained and behaved pet is the dream of all pet owners. In order for this to happen it takes dedication and hard work from both the owner and the animal. The owner must be diligent and determined. Training an animal takes time and can be a long process. Animals are creatures of habit. After some time of training things will become routine for them, it will be second nature, eventually requiring no verbal command.

Some animals will be more eager to learn than others and some will cooperate more than others. This depends on the breed, species and the age of the animal. Puppies and kittens may have a shorter attention span versus a five year old dog or cat. A Lab may have more energy versus a Great Dane.

Here are the actions we will be taking with Binx. We plan to introduce him to clicker training, to put a good method in place for interacting with him when he is not behaving the way we want. We want a method that promotes positive reinforcement and demotes negative reinforcement. We may need to use some medication to help calm his nerves and his anxiety. If an animal’s anxiety is shooting through the roof it is hard for them to learn and obey. We want him to be open to learning throughout the process, and as soon as he is trained taper him off any meds because he will no longer need them.

Dealing with behavior problems is a process. One must remember that hard work does pay off in the end, so don’t give up and stick with it! Remember you are not alone and we are here with any questions or concerns you may have. Good luck!

Post Tagged with cats, Christy Stone DVM, dogs, Dr. Tim Klein, mankato veterinarian, mapleton veterinarian, pet behavior problems, pet health, pet training, Sarah Wise DVM, veterinarian.

My Morning at Work!

My Morning at Work!
Christy Stone, DVM
All Pets Medicine, Surgery, and Rehabilitation Clinic

Wow, I just read last week’s blog from Dr. Klein and now it’s my turn and somehow I’m not sure I’m as articulate as he is!

Just like Dr. Klein, this is also my first time ever writing a blog. I hope you will all entertain me and not “unfriend” us on face book if my performance is less than stellar! Ha!

As I was thinking about what to write, I thought I’d do my first blog on something “fuzzy”. No pun intended smile

I really had a great morning at work today…. and here’s what it looked like…..

7:00 am—I stopped by our local humane shelter and picked up a kitty cat to come to work with me and be spayed. Meadow is a beautiful tiger striped, one year old female, who greeted me by trying to climb onto my head!

8:00 am – I strolled into the office with my pumpkin spice Casey’s cappuccino in hand and was greeted by our buzzing technicians getting things ready for the day. I am truly blessed to work with the people I work with. Our technicians are all very knowledgeable, trained professionals, but most of all they are some of the most compassionate, fun-loving people that I know.

8:05 am – I got to meet Courtney. Courtney is the reason I am having such a great day and decided to write this blog. Courtney is a veterinary technician student at the Minnesota School of Business and was here to shadow our staff this morning. I absolutely love seeing people find their passion in this world and getting excited about their future. I think that sometimes we get so comfortable doing what we do that we forget how amazing and wonderful our jobs really are. This morning I was reminded of that….that feeling the first time you calculate a drug dose, the first time you give an injection, the first time you glove up for surgery, the first time you try to pull blood and actually succeed!! Then there are the emotional firsts: the first time you help save an animal’s life, the first time you see a puppy or kitten being born (or any other of God’s creatures), the first time you help a stray pet find its forever home, and the first time you sit with a family who has lost a dear friend. Eight years into my career, I still have plenty of “firsts”, but they are getting farther between yet never less satisfying at the end of the day. The other thing I love about being around people like Courtney is they have lots of questions. Questions must be answered and it drives all of us to dust off those old files in our brains that we maybe haven’t used in awhile. After I’ve really had to think about something and then proven to myself that I really do know it, I am always thankful for those never ending student loans.

8:10-12:00– So, to finish out the morning, we helped 3 sick pets, spayed 3 cats, neutered one cat, neutered two rabbits, and fixed the partridge in the pear tree! smile I hope that you all are having as wonderful of a day as I am! Now back to work!

Post Tagged with animal shelter, cats, Christy Stone DVM, dogs, faribault county humane society, humane shelter, job shadow, mankato vet, mankato veterinarian, mapleton veterinarian, martin county humane society, neuter, pet health, rabbit, rabbit health, Riverside Humane Society, Sarah Wise DVM, spay, Tim Klein DVM, veterinarian, veterinary clinic, veterinary technician

Hey … Perceptions really are Reality!!!

Hey … Perceptions really are Reality!!!
Tim Klein, DVM
All Pets Medicine, Surgery, and Rehabilitation Clinic

Another first for me – writing a Blog! I have actually been looking forward to this, anytime we have a chance to have some direct contact with our clients my pupils dilate just a little. But we had to wait until our web page was updated and all that, and now here we are!

So our plan is to blog weekly. We’ll rotate it through the veterinarians and technicians here at All Pets Clinic, so you will get a lot of different perspectives.

So … here we go!

Ever think about how our perceptions affect our opinions of things? One of the best illustrations I have seen of this is a story that I saw in a book that I read when I was in my late 20’s. In the story below the author uses the word “paradigm” to mean the same thing as “perceptions”.

I remember a mini-paradigm shift I experienced one Sunday morning on a subway in New York. People were sitting quietly – some reading newspapers, some lost in thought, some resting with their eyes closed. It was a calm, peaceful scene.

Then suddenly, a man and his children entered the subway car. The children were so loud and rambunctious that instantly the whole climate changed.

The man sat down next to me and closed his eyes, apparently oblivious to the situation. The children were yelling back and forth, throwing things, even grabbing people’s papers. It was very disturbing. And yet, the man next to me did nothing.

It was difficult not to feel irritated. I could not believe that he could be so insensitive as to let his children run wild like that and do nothing about it, taking no responsibility at all. It was easy to see that everyone else on the subway felt irritated, too. So finally, with what I felt was unusual patience and restraint, I turned to him and said, “Sir, your children are really disturbing a lot of people. I wonder if you couldn’t control them a little more?”

The man lifted his gaze as if to come to a consciousness of the situation for the first time and said softly, “oh, you’re right. I guess I should do something about it. We just came from the hospital where their mother died about an hour ago. I don’t know what to think, and I guess they don’t know how to handle it either.”

Stephen R. Covey
The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

What a good example of how we can be so sure of what is going on, only to have our whole perception changed with a little bit of information, and what an “ahaaa!” moment it can be when our perceptions are changed.

It seems like what happens at a vet clinic should be fairly straight forward. Certain symptoms + Certain blood tests = Certain diagnosis and Certain Treatments. And sometimes it does work that way. However it’s not always quite that simple.

When I read the story above, it really helped me to better understand situations we see occasionally. Like when a canine patient with a graying muzzle comes in, walking a little stiffly and sits/stands very slowly and deliberately, and the family member says “he’s just a little stiff, that’s just normal at his age”. Biologically, we know that patient is experiencing hip pain, and that canine patients are great at hiding mild to moderate pain, so if he is showing any stiffness at all, the pain really is affecting his quality of life.

But the family member’s perception is different than what is happening biologically, and, just like the story above, I need to both be careful not to sit in judgment and I also need to realize that none of my training as a veterinarian will impact my patient without first addressing the family’s perception. And changing someone’s perception about osteoarthritis in dogs is not just about education; I can’t just give a handout with scientific jargon and expect that “ahaaa!” moment to occur.

Changing perceptions is as much about changing how a person “feels” inside about a subject as it is about simply educating. I have to admit that just giving a handout is quite a bit easier.

Understanding that has helped me a lot. We see perceptions about vaccinations, dental disease, arthritis, fleas, ticks, etc. that do not necessarily match what we know is happening biologically. Yes, working in a veterinary clinic means we need to educate about all of those things. However, our patients and our clients benefit most when we are not judgmental like the author in the story above, but still try to “nudge” their perceptions toward that biological reality. That is way different than symptoms = diagnosis = treatment.

Because, hey … Perceptions really are Reality!!!

Hope you have a great day! Tim

Post Tagged with arthritis, cats, dental disease, dogs, Dr. Tim Klein, mankato vet, mankato veterinarian, mapleton veterinarian, pet health, Tim Klein DVM, tooth pain, vaccinations, veterinarian.

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